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Trade Data

OTA’s most recent request for additional organic tracking codes has led to the creation of 11 new codes that will go into effect January 1, 2015. The new codes cover organic salad mixes in both large and small packages, carrots reduced in size and baby carrots, beets, peas, asparagus, limes, watermelons, peaches, and berries.
As a result, there will be
covering organic exports.
38 unique codes
OTA’s most recent request for additional organic tracking codes has led to the creation of 11 new codes that will go into effect January 1, 2015. The new codes cover organic salad mixes in both large and small packages, carrots reduced in size and baby carrots, beets, peas, asparagus, limes, watermelons, peaches, and berries.
As a result, there will be
covering organic exports.
38 unique codes

Alert

OTA has underwritten two significant International Trade Data Reports to build a sound set of data for organic stakeholders and policymakers.

Facilitating Organic Trade Globally

HTS codes are key in helping monitor the success and growth of the organic industry over time. The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) was enacted by Congress and made effective on January 1, 1989, replacing the former Tariff Schedules of the United States. The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) publishes and maintains the U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule and provides technical information on its structure and modification. The schedule and codes serve a few important functions. OTA is most interested in their use as statistical reference for tracking trade data. 
 
This structure is based upon the international Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS) administered by the World Customs Organization in Brussels. The four and six digit HS product categories are subdivided into eight digit rate lines unique to the U.S. and 10-digit non-legal statistical reporting categories. These 10-digit codes help several federal organizations track the level of international trade for a specific product. While there are thousands of HS codes in action today, there are only handfuls for organic-specific products.
 
Formal submission requests for new codes are accepted in April and August each year through the Office of Tariff Affairs and Trade Agreements of the U.S. International Trade Commission. However, there are some key requirements for a code to even be considered. First, the product needs to generate at least $1million in U.S. dollars in trade annually. Next, this trade floor minimum must be generated by at least three exporting entities.  The second rule is in place to protect company-specific trade information.  Finally, data pertaining to trade needs to be consistently available to publish. 
 
Establishing both export and import codes are crucial to monitoring the growth of the organic industry.  OTA will continue to submit requests for new codes throughout the year. As OTA continues to promote equivalency arrangements with major trading partners and the organic industry as a whole continues to grow, we aim to increase the number of organic codes being tracked to gain official data and more accurately measure the impact of global organic trade. 
 
For more information on HTS Codes, to submit a suggestion for submission, or to join the HTS Code Task Force, contact Monique Marez, OTA’s Director of International Trade.
 

Learn More

Global Organic Trade Guide                U.S. Organic Export Directory

 

Organic Imports: A necessary evil, a crisis, or hope for the Global South? OTA's International Trade Data Report 


Contact
Monique Marez
Director, International Trade
(202) 403-8515

 

The Organic Trade Association does not discriminate on the basis of age, disability, national origin or ancestry, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, marital status, political affiliation or military status. Persons with disabilities who require alternate means for communication of program information can contact us at info@ota.com.

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