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Market Analysis

If you’re looking for the scoop on the organic industry, you’ve come to the right place! OTA is the premier source of information about organic. Whether you need market data or consumer insights, OTA is here to help. 
 
  • U.S. Organic Industry Survey 2015
  • Sales of organic food and non-food products in the United States broke through another record in 2014, totaling $39.1 billion, up 11.3 percent from the previous year. Organic sales now near a milestone 5 percent share of the total food market.
  • The organic dairy sector posted an almost 11 percent jump in sales in 2014 to $5.46 billion, the biggest percentage increase for that category in six years.
  • Sales of organic non-food products – accounting for 8 percent of the total organic market – posted the biggest percentage gain in six years, with sales of organic fiber and organic personal care products the stand-out categories.
 
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  • U.S. Families' Organic Attitudes and Beliefs Survey 2015 
  • 78 percent of organic buyers say they typically buy their organic foods at conventional food stores/supermarkets. Over half also shop organic at the “big box” stores, and some 30 percent also report that it’s not unusual to buy organic at one of the warehouse clubs in the country.
  • African American and Hispanic families have been steadily increasing among the ranks of organic-buying households.
  • The OTA survey also looks at the incomes, education and ages of organic buyers, and compares the buying habits of the new organic purchaser to the more experienced organic consumer. 
 
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  • U.S. Cotton Survey 2014
  • Acres planted to organic cotton decreased by eight percent, from 16,050 acres in 2011 to 14,787 in 2012. However acres harvested increased to 9,842 in 2012—a 60 percent gain over 2011.
  • 8,867 bales were produced in 2012, representing an increase of approximately 22 percent over the prior year. 
  • Commercial availability of organic seed is among the major hurdles for organic cotton producers. However, promising research is being conducted by a team at Texas A&M AgriLife Research in Lubbock, TX on improving organic and non-GM cottonseed, including fiber quality and yields, as well as increased tolerance to drought, pests and weeds.
 
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Contact
Market Data Inquiries: 
Associate Director, Conference & Product Development   
(802) 275-3831
Media Inquiries: 
Director of Media Relations
(202) 403-8514
 
 
 
 
 
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