SandwichActivity

Sandwich Super Sleuth - Organic Trade Association
Organic Trade Association
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Sandwich Super Sleuth

 

Activity: Sandwich super Sleuths

In this activity students will attempt to discover where a tomato and cheese sandwich actually originated.  They will trace a food item from its place as a sandwich ingredient back to where it was originally grown.


Background:

Students may not readily recognize where food originates. They may believe that it comes in packages or containers from the grocery store shelf. They may not connect food to farms or ranches or the ocean or lakes and rivers. Most children don’t even think about how the food is prepared and transported.  That being the case, students probably have even less of an idea as to what “organic” means. To them it may just be a word on a label.  The point of this activity is to encourage students to think about where their food comes from, how it was grown and processed, and the important role that agriculture plays in their lives.  In today’s society, with more and more people living in urban areas, they are more and more removed from the source of their food.

Consider the big, juicy organic orange sitting on your desk.  How did it get there? Maybe you bought it at your local market, but where’s the orange tree that it came from? Maybe the orange grove is five hundred miles away and it was shipped to your market.  Maybe it came across the country. How was the orange grown? How did the grower control pests? Who grew the orange and picked it and packed it for shipping? How was it shipped? Was it stored before shipping? These are the kinds of questions your students will think about as they analyze a tomato and cheese sandwich.

The goal of this activity is to elicit from students the ideas they already have about their food and where it comes from – to discover how many students already know how food is grown, transported, stored, and prepared. This will give you a baseline understanding of your students’ current level of knowledge of food and food production.


Before you Begin:

You may wish to make tomato and cheese sandwiches for each group, or give students the opportunity to make their own.  If not, try to bring in the sandwich ingredients as visual aids.


Note:

Non-diary cheese substitutes are available.


What you need:

For the class:

  • organic tomatoes
  • packages of organic sliced cheese
  • loaf  of organic bread
  • jar of organic mustard

For each group:

  • one large sheet of chart paper
  • markers and pencils

For each student:

  • journal or notebook
  • pen or pencil
  • bag lunch (optional)

What To Do:

Before beginning this activity, brainstorm with students what they think the word “organic” means.  Accept all answers. Record them on the chart paper. Throughout the activities in this book, refer back to the list and allow students to update their thoughts as they investigate what “organic” means.

  1. Divide students into a minimum of three groups. One group will be the tomato group; another will be the cheese group and a third will be the bread group. A fourth option can be a mustard group.
  2. Ask each group to brainstorm the origins of their group’s food item. Suggest that each group draw a picture of the food and then map where it came from.  Encourage students to describe in as much detail as they can what they know about how the food is grown and processed. Stimulate their thinking with questions such as:
    • What is the main ingredient in your food item?
    • What else can be made from this item?
    • What does it look like in its unprocessed form?
    • Where in the country does it grow?
    • How did it become what it is now?
    • Who works on that kind of farm?
    • Is that farm a healthy place to work or live?
  1. Circulate among the groups. If students need help, encourage them to consider how the food got to the store; where it was grown; who raised and/or harvested it; who prepared it and packaged it; and how it was stored and transported.
  2. After students have finished their diagrams, invite each group to share its drawing with the class.
  3. Discuss each group’s diagram.

Observations:

  • How many steps were involved in bringing these items to the market?
  • Where did the food items originate?
  • What do these food items have in common?
  • Where are they in the “food chain”?
  • What would the animals involved need to eat?

Conclusion:

Once students are aware that all of the food items they diagrammed are grown or raised from the earth, engage them in a discussion of different ways of growing food. Have some examples of organic food items to show students. Ask students what it means when a label says that food is “organic”.


Extensions:

  • Repeat this activity, this time having students select one item from her or his bag lunch. Ask each student to diagram the steps involved in bringing the lunch food item from the field to the lunchroom.

Have students bring in organic and non-organic packaged foods to compare labels and content.

Activity: Sandwich super Sleuths

In this activity students will attempt to discover where a tomato and cheese sandwich actually originated.  They will trace a food item from its place as a sandwich ingredient back to where it was originally grown.


Background:

Students may not readily recognize where food originates. They may believe that it comes in packages or containers from the grocery store shelf. They may not connect food to farms or ranches or the ocean or lakes and rivers. Most children don’t even think about how the food is prepared and transported.  That being the case, students probably have even less of an idea as to what “organic” means. To them it may just be a word on a label.  The point of this activity is to encourage students to think about where their food comes from, how it was grown and processed, and the important role that agriculture plays in their lives.  In today’s society, with more and more people living in urban areas, they are more and more removed from the source of their food.

Consider the big, juicy organic orange sitting on your desk.  How did it get there? Maybe you bought it at your local market, but where’s the orange tree that it came from? Maybe the orange grove is five hundred miles away and it was shipped to your market.  Maybe it came across the country. How was the orange grown? How did the grower control pests? Who grew the orange and picked it and packed it for shipping? How was it shipped? Was it stored before shipping? These are the kinds of questions your students will think about as they analyze a tomato and cheese sandwich.

The goal of this activity is to elicit from students the ideas they already have about their food and where it comes from – to discover how many students already know how food is grown, transported, stored, and prepared. This will give you a baseline understanding of your students’ current level of knowledge of food and food production.


Before you Begin:

You may wish to make tomato and cheese sandwiches for each group, or give students the opportunity to make their own.  If not, try to bring in the sandwich ingredients as visual aids.


Note:

Non-diary cheese substitutes are available.


What you need:

For the class:

  • organic tomatoes
  • packages of organic sliced cheese
  • loaf  of organic bread
  • jar of organic mustard

For each group:

  • one large sheet of chart paper
  • markers and pencils

For each student:

  • journal or notebook
  • pen or pencil
  • bag lunch (optional)

What To Do:

Before beginning this activity, brainstorm with students what they think the word “organic” means.  Accept all answers. Record them on the chart paper. Throughout the activities in this book, refer back to the list and allow students to update their thoughts as they investigate what “organic” means.

  1. Divide students into a minimum of three groups. One group will be the tomato group; another will be the cheese group and a third will be the bread group. A fourth option can be a mustard group.
  2. Ask each group to brainstorm the origins of their group’s food item. Suggest that each group draw a picture of the food and then map where it came from.  Encourage students to describe in as much detail as they can what they know about how the food is grown and processed. Stimulate their thinking with questions such as:
    • What is the main ingredient in your food item?
    • What else can be made from this item?
    • What does it look like in its unprocessed form?
    • Where in the country does it grow?
    • How did it become what it is now?
    • Who works on that kind of farm?
    • Is that farm a healthy place to work or live?
  1. Circulate among the groups. If students need help, encourage them to consider how the food got to the store; where it was grown; who raised and/or harvested it; who prepared it and packaged it; and how it was stored and transported.
  2. After students have finished their diagrams, invite each group to share its drawing with the class.
  3. Discuss each group’s diagram.

Observations:

  • How many steps were involved in bringing these items to the market?
  • Where did the food items originate?
  • What do these food items have in common?
  • Where are they in the “food chain”?
  • What would the animals involved need to eat?

Conclusion:

Once students are aware that all of the food items they diagrammed are grown or raised from the earth, engage them in a discussion of different ways of growing food. Have some examples of organic food items to show students. Ask students what it means when a label says that food is “organic”.


Extensions:

  • Repeat this activity, this time having students select one item from her or his bag lunch. Ask each student to diagram the steps involved in bringing the lunch food item from the field to the lunchroom.

Have students bring in organic and non-organic packaged foods to compare labels and content.

 
 
2014 Annual Fund

Research and Promotion 2012

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